Province of Cádiz


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The province of Cádiz sits at the southern most part of Western Europe, in the autonomous Spanish region of Andalusia, where the Atlantic Ocean meets the Mediterranean Sea.

The area is steeped in history dating to prehistoric times. The advent of the written word saw the capital city called “Gades” by Plato in his story of Atlantis, the lost city rumored to be buried in the marshes of Doñana National Park. And it is from this Greek word for the city, that the term “Gaditano” is derived, to describe the people, food, sense of humor and philosophy of the locals.

They sometimes call the province, “Cádizfornia” because of the surfable waves rolling onto its wide beaches, the swaying palm trees of the boardwalks and mountains a short drive away from the wild coast. It even has its own Bay Area, one of the six “comarcas” that comprise the province, each of which offers visitors different sights, smells and flavors to accompany their Gaditano adventure.

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La Comida Gaditana

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Despite the popularity of the paleodiet, no one knows what the original prehistoric inhabitants of the province drank and ate. Records from the time of the the Phoenicians and Romans show the salt from the wetlands as the popular way to curate and store the fish caught in both the Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea.

Today, “salazón“; plr: “salazones” (salting) is still a popular way to treat the food, which like almost every where else on earth, is influenced by its environment. Although in some parts of Cádiz you won’t hear an “s” when the waiter says those words, but a “th”. This includes the Spanish for the fish and seafood (pescado y marisco) caught in two distinct bodies of water. Deep frying it in oil (aceite de oliva) is said to give the pescaito frito (little fried fish) a unique flavor and goes well with a glass of fino (sherry) from the three cities that specialize in the sweet white wine. Or perhaps you’d prefer a “cervezita“, beer served in a small glass or bottle so not to lose its coolness before you finish.

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Cádiz city

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Jerez de la Frontera

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Chiclana de la Frontera

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Medina Sidonia

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Puerto Santa Maria

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Barbate

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